Volume 1, Issue 3, August 2017, Page: 87-92
An Outline of Some Key Recommendations to Improve and Manage Forest Trees in Northern Nigerian Soil Ecosystem –A Short Message
Suleiman Usman, Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Federal University Dutse (FUD), Dutse, Nigeria
Abubakar Halilu Girei, Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Federal University Dutse (FUD), Dutse, Nigeria
Michael Edet Nkereuwem, Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Federal University Dutse (FUD), Dutse, Nigeria
Received: May 4, 2017;       Accepted: May 26, 2017;       Published: Jul. 3, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.be.20170103.15      View  1858      Downloads  92
Abstract
In recent years, the concern about degradation and deforestation of forest trees has changed from negative consequences and decline of many important natural species, to thinking about ways to improve and manage the remaining plants in northern Nigeria. The benefits of this management has been noted to ensure the sustainable use of woods for fuel, honey for medicine and other human needs, fruits for eating, fodder and grasses for livestock and many other important plant resources for medicinal purposes in local communities. Deforestation and desertification caused serious damage to most of the forest areas in northern Nigeria. Many advices and practices continue to provide favourable environment for better management of the African forests. Sustainable forest management was considered as an alternative to maintains and improves the soil biodiversity, soil productivity, regeneration capacity, vitality and potential of the economic values of northern Nigerian forest trees. As part of this sustainable forest management practices, this paper, provides an outline of some key recommendations on how to improve, maintain and manage forest trees and their soil biodiversity in the region.
Keywords
Advice, Forest Trees, Manage, Improve, Northern Nigeria
To cite this article
Suleiman Usman, Abubakar Halilu Girei, Michael Edet Nkereuwem, An Outline of Some Key Recommendations to Improve and Manage Forest Trees in Northern Nigerian Soil Ecosystem –A Short Message, Bioprocess Engineering. Vol. 1, No. 3, 2017, pp. 87-92. doi: 10.11648/j.be.20170103.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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